FEMA: Disaster Assistance Tops $50 Million to Florida Government and Nonprofits

The state and FEMA continue collaborating to bring federal disaster dollars to Florida for Hurricane Irma-related expenses. The agency’s Public Assistance program has provided Florida more than $50 million to reimburse local governments and certain nonprofits for disaster-related projects.

Below are examples of the funding so far:

  • Monroe County: about $3.3 million for emergency response activities addressing public hazards, assisting evacuations and other safety measures.
  • City of Key West in Monroe County: about $1.9 million for emergency response activities addressing public hazards, assisting evacuations and other safety measures.
  • Collier County: about $10.6 million for a county-wide debris removal—including curbside collections—project totaling $11.8 million. Nonfederal sources will pick up the remaining amount.
  • Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles: about $8 million for emergency response activities addressing public hazards, assisting evacuations and other safety measures.
  • Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office: more than $1 million for emergency response activities addressing public hazards, assisting evacuations and other safety measures.
  • Lee County Sheriff’s Office: about $3.2 million for emergency response activities addressing public hazards, assisting evacuations and other safety measures.
  • Manatee County Sheriff’s Office: about $1 million for emergency response activities addressing public hazards, assisting evacuations and other safety measures

Long-term Commitment

The funds are part of the state and FEMA’s long-term commitment to help Florida communities recover from Hurricane Irma and reimburse all eligible disaster-related expenses. The state and the agency continue working together on recovery projects with more than 1,000 government entities and nonprofits across Florida through Public Assistance.

Public Assistance reimburses state and local governments and some private nonprofits for disaster-generated debris removal, the cost of preparing for and responding to the disaster and repairing or replacing eligible infrastructure including roads, bridges, buildings and utilities.

Documentation Is the Backbone of Public Assistance

Federal law requires state agencies, local governments and nonprofits to submit documents that validate expenses they’re requesting. Documents describe required work, estimated costs and other important information related to reimbursement requests.

FEMA needs this documentation to move applications forward because it supports disaster-related claims for federal dollars. Agency representatives work directly with the state entity, local government or nonprofit throughout the process to ensure FEMA receives everything it needs to review eligibility.

Diligent documentation may also prevent inconvenient budget-busting requests asking for the money back when auditors review funding records and discover mistakes.

How Money Is Received

FEMA provides reimbursement expenses to the state after confirming eligibility. The state is responsible for disbursing funds to the state agency, local government or nonprofit.

Federal Cost Share

The federal share of Public Assistance in Florida’s Hurricane Irma recovery is at least 75 percent of the eligible cost. The state determines how the remaining nonfederal cost share is paid.

For more Hurricane Irma recovery information, visit www.FEMA.gov/IrmaFL, follow FEMA on Twitter @FEMARegion4 on Twitter and go to FEMA’s Facebook page at Facebook.com/FEMA.

Helping people before, during, and after disasters.

Disaster recovery assistance is available without regard to race, color, religion, nationality, sex, age, disability, English proficiency or economic status. If you or someone you know has been discriminated against, call FEMA toll-free at 800-621-FEMA (3362). For TTY call 800-462-7585.

FEMA’s temporary housing assistance and grants for public transportation expenses, medical and dental expenses, and funeral and burial expenses do not require individuals to apply for an SBA loan. However, applicants who receive SBA loan applications must submit them to SBA to be eligible for assistance that covers personal property, vehicle repair or replacement, and moving and storage expenses.

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